Livelihood Restoration And Resilience Building Of Vulnerable And Marginalised Comunities In Post-Flood Kerala

Livelihood Restoration And Resilience Building Of Vulnerable And Marginalised Comunities In Post-Flood Kerala

Kerala is a state that is extremely vulnerable to natural disasters and the changing climatic dynamics. The Kerala State Disaster Management Plan has identified 39 hazards and categorized them into naturally triggered hazards and anthropogenically triggered hazards. Floods are the most common natural hazards, with nearly 14.5% of the state’s regions prone to floods, while the percentage is as high as 50% in certain districts.

The August 2018 floods in Kerala created severe damage to the fragile ecosystem of the state, especially the Pampa river, the third longest river in Kerala which majorly flows through the district of Pathanamthitta. About 50 lakh people depend on the Pampa for their daily water needs. Some major wetlands of the Pampa river that are a key source of agriculture and drinking water for the communities living around them have also been severely affected, resulting in the loss of livelihoods for the local communities.

To help these communities regain their livelihoods and reduce their vulnerabilities to the impacts of such natural disasters, WISE, in collaboration with FORD Foundation, is working with the poor and marginalised sections of people in Koipuram village of Pathanamthitta district, with the objective of developing a Resilience Action Plan that would convert the “lessons learned” from the August 2018 (and 2019) floods into sustainable actions, thus making these vulnerable communities more resilient to such disasters in the future. The project is ongoing.

Facilitating Multilevel Climate Governance In Kerala

Facilitating Multilevel Climate Governance In Kerala

The current project aims to strengthen climate action in the state of Kerala through the facilitation of a multi-level climate governance framework. As part of the project, the WISE team is involved in mapping institutions, players, programs, schemes, etc., that guide and influence climate governance in Kerala and assess the extent to which the concerned authorities are informed and equipped institutionally and financially in meeting state and national climate goals.

Extensive field survey and primary data collection to assess, analyze and evaluate the barriers and challenges facing the current governance regime, as also drivers enabling progress are being carried out at the local level. The final outcome of the project is a more empowered and strengthened governance system (and stakeholders). The project is being carried out in collaboration with Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation and is currently ongoing.

Enabling A Circular Economy for E-Waste in Pune City

Enabling A Circular Economy for E-Waste in Pune City

The US Consulate General, Mumbai, organised a joint US-India conference in 2017, announcing a grant competition for waste management innovation in India. The focus of the competition was to assess the current status of waste management in India—under any one of the different waste management topics presented—and explore innovative solutions that could be tested and adopted in the country, sharing global best practices and experiences in the process. WISE was awarded the seed grant for the project, which was evaluated and monitored on behalf of the US Consulate General, Mumbai, by The Ohio State University.

WISE worked on developing a participatory, e-waste management implementation strategy for Pune city with the objective of capturing 60% of the e-waste generated in the next two years. To this end, WISE undertook extensive stakeholder consultations with players at every level of the waste ecosystem, right from rag pickers to government functionaries, and assessed key technical and operational challenges, as well as institutional and administrative gaps. The findings and insights from the exercise were then contextualized with global best circular economy models in the waste management space taking into consideration the health and environmental impacts of possible circular economy strategies.

WISE proposed an innovative circular economy-oriented business model for Pune city for e-waste management. It detailed a comprehensive action plan (short-term and long-term) to implement the recommended model, create base-level awareness, build the capacity of concerned stakeholders and strengthen institutional mechanisms for e-waste management in Pune city in the coming years.

The Action Plan was disseminated through a variety of channels including WISE and OSU websites, stakeholder websites, email blasts, and social media. Additionally, focus group meetings were held to ensure the feasibility of plan implementation. The final report of the WISE project has met with wide acceptability among city officials and key stakeholders across the value chain. In particular, the WISE team briefed the Joint Municipal Commissioner, Solid Waste Management, PMC, Dnyaneshwar Molak, and other key stakeholders, and received an enthusiastic response. The recommended Strategic Action Plan is expected to pave the way for more informed decisions by policy-makers and e-waste chain participants, leading to development of a circular economy in Pune.

See Report Link

The Energy Report: 100% RE for Kerala by 2050

The Energy Report: 100% RE for Kerala by 2050

The project funded by WWF Norway and administered by WWF India was the Indian state equivalent of WWF Global’s ambitious report on 100% RE for the world. The project required WISE to assess the feasibility of meeting 100% energy from RE in Kerala by 2050.

WISE carried out detailed stakeholder interactions in Kerala with its topmost stakeholders and experts in the energy and environment domain and assessed the renewable energy potential (wind and solar) of the state using Geographic Information System (GIS) tools and high-resolution datasets of land use and land cover, topography and resource layers. The project team also used an open-source modelling tool to design different energy demand scenarios and model impacts on energy utilization through energy conservation, energy efficiency and energy substitution (renewable energy use). The energy model covered electricity, industrial heat and transport energy.

The report was widely disseminated and some of the recommendations from the report were implemented by the state electricity department and state nodal agency. The main conclusion that emerged was that Kerala can technically meet about 95% of its energy demand from RE by 2050. Based on the report, the Kerala State Electricity Board created a separate division for development of renewables, resulting in the sector gaining momentum in the state. Post the project, WISE was requested by the state to undertake a follow-up project focusing on Palakkad district in Kerala. Both the reports were widely appreciated and, on the request of the state, were translated into the local language, Malayalam, for enabling wider dissemination.

See Report link

CLEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY ACTION PLAN FOR THREE STATES

CLEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY ACTION PLAN FOR THREE STATES

The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (UK-FCO) awarded a project to WISE to develop clean energy technology action plans for three states: Karnataka, Maharashtra and Rajasthan. The main objectives of the project were to strengthen the states’ renewable energy capacity and address energy security concerns across various sectors including power, industry, water and transport.

WISE undertook this project in 2009 at a time when wind energy was fledgling and solar energy was not yet established. The awareness levels in state governments about RE technologies and clean energy were low. WISE undertook a comprehensive literature review and data analysis exercise across diverse sectors and worked with the states’ top bureaucrats to consult and prepare a roadmap and action plan for accelerating clean energy interventions. Under the project, WISE also undertook a detailed renewable resource assessment that suggested huge RE potential (wind and solar) in the GW range.

Consequent to the preparation of the Draft Action Plans, a series of workshops were held in each state capital—Bengaluru, Mumbai, and Jaipur—with participation from various departments, agencies and utilities of the state governments. Participation was also open to various central agencies, private utilities, and NGOs. The first round of three workshops were held for detailed presentation and briefing on the contents/recommendations of the Draft Action Plans, stressing the need for each department/agency to critically examine the recommendations and provide feedback in the light of their own perspective and emerging policies. The second round of three workshops were held to garner the feedback for the Draft Action Plans. Based on the detailed feedback received, the Draft Action Plans were suitably modified and finalised, prior to formal submission to the state governments.
The third round of three workshops were Policy Workshops, emphasising the emergent need for coordinated policy changes at the sectoral and inter-sectoral levels, if the combined challenges posed by climate change, future energy security, and environmental sustainability were to be suitably addressed. The final round of three workshops were Capacity Building Workshops, concentrating on the techno-economics and potential for renewables to simultaneously address the above challenges through institution building.

In addition, six Media Briefings were also held, three coinciding with the release of the Draft Action Plans, and three with the formal presentation of the Final Action Plans. Print and visual media representatives were present in large numbers in all the three states.
The study findings were groundbreaking and received extensive publicity. Copies of the three Action Plans were submitted to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy and the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Govt. of India.

Many of the implementation strategies, mainly in the area of renewable energy policy and regulation received considerable traction through direct state government action over the next five to ten years.